Morrison backdown on Integrity Commission

Today, after 12 months of denial, the government has been dragged kicking and screaming to a National Integrity Commission – but it’s clear Scott Morrison is not being honest here.

MARK DREYFUS QC MP
SHADOW ATTORNEY-GENERAL
SHADOW MINISTER FOR NATIONAL SECURITY
MEMBER FOR ISAACS
 

MORRISON BACKDOWN ON INTEGRITY COMMISSION
 

Today, after 12 months of denial, the government has been dragged kicking and screaming to a National Integrity Commission – but it’s clear Scott Morrison is not being honest here.
 
Make no mistake – this is not a decision of principle. It is a decision of political expediency from a desperate and chaotic government.
 
Labor is pleased that the government has once again been forced to take our lead on an important policy matter, after months of pressure – just as occurred with the banking Royal Commission.
 
It is unfortunate that it has taken them so long.
 
Since Labor announced our policy in January, the government has consistently refused our offers of cooperation to establish a federal anti-corruption body before the election, and denied such a body was even necessary.
 
Just last month, senior Liberal Christopher Pyne said of a National Integrity Commission:
 
I don’t think that’s necessary at the national level and it’s just another way of Bill Shorten trying to distract people from the real issues that matter.

  • Sky News, 19 November 2018

 

The Prime Minister himself labelled it a ‘fringe issue’ in Parliament.
 
The Attorney-General first said in writing he saw no persuasive evidence for such a body.
 
Labor will examine the detail put forward by the government today and come to a position on their proposal in due course. It is clear, however, that the government has proposed something far weaker than Labor’s proposal, and falls short of the principles Labor set out in January.

THURSDAY, 13 DECEMBER 2018