House of Representatives Speech- Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 2014-2015

I want to address some questions to the Minister for Justice about section 18C, but first I want to mention the comments that have just been made by the member for Higgins and responded to by the minister in relation to the Secure Schools Program. What was missing from the minister's answer and, indeed, what was missing from what was said by the member for Higgins was any acknowledgement—and one was due—about the fact that there is bipartisan support for the Secure Schools Program and that there was $20 million in the 2008 budget for three years for the Secure Schools Program to fund security works not just in Jewish schools but in schools at risk from racially and religiously motivated violence, which we deplore, not just in Melbourne but throughout Australia. And there was a further $15 million in the 2011 budget over three years, which I had assumed had bipartisan support.

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House of Representatives Speech- Petitions: Adriana Rivas

I rise to present to the House a petition from more than 600 members of the Chilean community in Australia and their supporters. It has been considered by the Standing Committee on Petitions and found to be in order.

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Australian Republican Movement Victorian Branch Forum

Speech to Australian Republican Movement Victorian Branch Forum

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House of Representatives Speech- Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 2014-2015

What a dreadful and disappointing budget was handed down by this government on 13 May. It is a dreadful and disappointing budget because it is filled with lies and broken promises, and it has been so seen by the people of Australia right across the country. Parents, young people, pensioners—anyone that uses the services the government provides can see now what they got when they elected the Abbott government in September last year. Just as the bunting around polling booths said, 'He wins, you lose,' now Australians can see just how right that prediction was from the Australian Labor Party. Tony Abbott did win the election and Australians lost in so many ways.

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House of Representatives Speech- Budget 2014

On 13 May this Liberal-National Party government delivered a deeply unpopular budget. Pensioners, young people, students, parents across my electorate have made this very, very clear to me since 13 May—in fact, people across Australia, because I have been to some other places other than my electorate in the couple of weeks since the budget. People in Bendigo, people in Castlemaine, people in Mornington in Victoria, people in Sydney and people here in Canberra have all made it very clear to me just how deeply unpopular this budget is. It is probably for that reason that an unnamed Liberal was quoted in the media today as describing this budget as 'a stinking carcass around the neck of this government'. And well might that description have been given to this budget, because for a whole range of reasons this budget has deeply disappointed Australians. It has deeply disappointed Australians because of the number of broken promises that we find in this budget. It has deeply disappointed Australians because of the unfair and uneven pain that this budget inflicts on so many Australians. And it is deeply unpopular and bitterly disappointing to Australians because of the wrong choices that this budget is full of.

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House of Representatives Speech- Community Legal Centres

The Attorney-General, Senator Brandis, said in an interview published on 17 April that he was 'a John Stuart Mill man'. He said that he has been a fan of free speech since he entered politics. Senator Brandis is a very selective fan of free speech. He is a fan of untrammelled speech for hateful demagogues but he is not a fan of informed public debate—precisely what John Stuart Mill actually intended freedom of speech to foster.

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Address on the Federal Budget to the ALP Victorian State Conference Dinner - Melbourne

Address on the Federal Budget to the ALP Victorian State Conference Dinner  

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House of Representatives Speech- South East Melbourne Manufacturing Forum

I want to thank representatives of the research, local government and industry sectors for contributing their views at the South East Melbourne Manufacturing Forum in Dandenong on 1 May. My colleagues—Senator Kim Carr; the member for Chisholm, Anna Burke; and the member for Hotham, Clare O'Neil—and I hosted the forum at the city of Greater Dandenong's new civic chambers to respond to local concerns about the impact of the closure of the Australian car industry on manufacturers across south-east Melbourne. Unlike the government, which has no plan and no ideas for the manufacturing sector, Labor cares and Labor is listening.

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House of Representatives Speech- Omnibus Repeal Day (Autumn 2014) Bill 2014, Amending Acts 1901 to 1969 Repeal Bill 2014, Statute Law Revision Bill (No. 1) 2014

I rise to speak to the Statute Law Revision Bill (No. 1) 2014 and the Amending Acts 1901 to 1969 Repeal Bill 2014. My colleague the member for Watson has spoken on the other bill before the House, the Omnibus Repeal Day (Autumn 2014) Bill 2014. Statute law revision bills are a routine piece of housekeeping undertaken by this parliament. They correct typographical and grammatical errors, they update language and they repeal spent or obsolete provisions. They are a completely unremarkable, largely clerical, practice which, in this country, dates back to before Federation. Commonwealth governments of both political persuasions have tended to introduce one or more such bills each year.

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House of Representatives Speech- Omnibus Repeal Day (Autumn 2014) Bill 2014, Amending Acts 1901 to 1969 Repeal Bill 2014, Statute Law Revision Bill (No. 1) 2014

I have a question for the member for Kooyong. By way of preface to that question, I feel I should point out that I have had occasion to look at several of the 1,120 amending acts that are to be repealed by the Amending Acts 1901 to 1969 Repeal Bill, one of the three bills before the House. One of those acts, No. 180, is the Statute Law Revision Act 1934. This act happens to be the first statute law revision act ever put through this parliament. As the member for Kooyong's great predecessor, the then Mr Latham, the Attorney-General, said in his second reading speech introducing the bill, the practice of using a statute law revision bill had been in place and had been actively pursued in England since 1861. He referred to no fewer than 37 occasions where similar acts had been passed by the British parliament. He also said, on the first statute law revision bill passing through this parliament:

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